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91st meeting of the Executive Committee

91st meeting of the Executive Committee

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 Summary of decisions of the 91st meeting

Post‑meeting summary of the 91st meeting of the Executive Committee

 

Introduction

The 91st meeting took place from 5 to 9 December 2022 and was attended by the representatives of 13 Executive Committee member countries and participants co‑opted from 26 other countries. The meeting was held in a hybrid format, in‑person, at the headquarters of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Montreal, Canada, and online, for any participants unable to attend in person due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic restrictions. Mr. Hassan Ali Mubarak of Bahrain presided as Chair of the Executive Committee during the meeting. Representatives of implementing agencies (IAs), UNEP as the Treasurer and the Executive Secretary and staff of the Ozone Secretariat participated as observers. The Vice-President of the Implementation Committee and members of the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP), a representative of the European Committee, representatives of the Environmental Investigation Agency, the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development, Natural Resources Defense Council and the Refrigerant Gas Manufacturers’ Association of India also attended as observers. The Executive Director of UNEP also attended the meeting as a special guest and addressed the Executive Committee members.

At the 91st meeting, the Committee took a total of 73 decisions, and approved project and work programme activities for 77 countries with a value of US $82,513,519, including agency support costs for IAs.

 

Secretariat activities[1] (decision 91/1)

 

The Executive Committee noted with appreciation the report on Secretariat activities and requested the Secretariat to transmit the management response of the Executive Committee on the 2019 Assessment of the Multilateral Fund by the Multilateral Organisation Performance Assessment Network (MOPAN).

 

Financial matters

 

Status of contributions and disbursements[2] (decision 91/2)

 

As at 5 December 2022, the balance of the Multilateral Fund stood at US $ 502,945,039 in cash. Following decision Ex.V/1 of the Fifth Extraordinary Meeting of the Parties, however, US $246 million in remaining funds that were due to the Multilateral Fund during the triennium 2018–2020 would be used after 2023 to support the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. Following decision Ex.V/2 of the Parties, the extension of the fixed‑exchange-rate-mechanism (FERM) to 2021-2023 replenishment was approved. The cumulative FERM loss as at 5 December 2022 is US $28,003,049. The Executive Committee urged all non-A5 Parties to pay their contributions to the Multilateral Fund in full and as early as possible and requested the Chief Officer and the Treasurer to continue to follow up with countries that had outstanding contributions.

Report on balances and availability of resources[3] (decision 91/3)

 

Bilateral and implementing agencies returned balances of US $21,199 and US $3,085,700, respectively, against completed projects to the Multilateral Fund. Taking into account the return of balances and the updated information reported by the Treasurer, sufficient resources were available for new commitments. The Executive Committee requested bilateral and IAs to disburse or cancel commitments not needed for completed projects and projects completed “by decision of the Executive Committee” and to return the balances at the 92nd meeting. UNDP, UNIDO and the World Bank were requested to disburse or cancel commitments for projects completed over two years previously and to return the balances at the 92nd meeting.

 

Accounts of the Multilateral Fund

 

Final 2021 accounts (decision 91/4)

 

The Executive Committee noted the final audited financial statements of the Multilateral Fund as at 31 December 2021[4] that had been prepared in accordance with the International Public Sector Accounting Standards. The Treasurer was requested to record in the 2022 accounts of the Multilateral Fund the differences between the IA’s provisional 2021 financial statements and their final 2021 financial statements.

 

Reconciliation of the 2021 accounts (decision 91/5)

 

The Executive Committee noted the reconciliation of the 2021 accounts[5] and requested the Treasurer and relevant IAs to carry out a number of adjustments and related actions. The Committee noted the 2021 outstanding reconciling items that would be updated prior to the 93rd meeting.

 

Budgets of the Fund Secretariat[6] (decision 91/6)

 

The Executive Committee noted the revised 2023, 2024 and proposed 2025 budget and the return of funds from the 2021 approved budget for the Secretariat. The Committee also approved two new posts for the Secretariat, the travel and daily subsistence allowance for one additional Article 5 delegate to Executive Committee meetings in line with decision XXXIV/17 of the Parties, the development of a knowledge management system, and the Umoja support. The revised 2023 budget of the Secretariat of US $8,645,326 was approved, based on the 2022 budget, including the projected overrun of US $290,000, the meetings of the Executive Committee in Montreal and a three per cent increase in staff costs. The revised 2024 budget of the Secretariat of US $8,610,023 was also approved, based on the 2023 budget, excluding the projected overrun, including two meetings of the Executive Committee in Montreal and a three per cent increase in staff costs. The proposed 2025 budget of the Secretariat of US $8,224,624 was also approved, based on the 2024 budget, excluding the projected overrun, including two meetings of the Executive Committee in Montreal and a three per cent increase in staff costs. The Committee also approved the proposal for an updated format for future budget presentations to allow for better alignment with UN standards.

 

Country programme data and prospects for compliance[7] (decision 91/7)

 

127 countries submitted their country programme data reports for the year 2021, including 15 received after the issuance of the document. The Secretariat was requested to provide the Ozone Secretariat with any HFC consumption data that it had that could assist the Ozone Secretariat in preparing the information requested under paragraph 2 of decision XXXIV/13 of the Parties. In addition, the Secretariat was requested to send letters to two parties with outstanding CP data reports for 2021.

 

Evaluation

 

Evaluation of the performance of implementing agencies against their 2021 business plans (decision 91/8)

 

The Executive Committee noted the evaluation of the performance of implementing agencies against their 2021 business plans.[8] It also encouraged national ozone units to submit, on a yearly basis and in a timely manner, their assessments of the qualitative performance of the bilateral and implementing agencies in assisting their governments. The Secretariat was requested to prepare in consultation with the implementing agencies, a revised set of performance indicators for consideration by the Executive Committee at its 93rd meeting, including ways to assess more effectively the performance of the implementing agencies.

 

Update on the status of the second phase of the evaluation of regional networks of national ozone officers

 

The Committee noted the update on the status of the second phase of the evaluation of regional networks of national ozone officers.[9]

 

Monitoring and evaluation work programme for the year 2023 (decision 91/9)

 

The monitoring and evaluation work programme for the year 2023[10] was approved at a budget of US $85,000. The Committee also decided to reallocate the amount of US $15,000 for the completion of the second phase of the evaluation of the regional networks of national ozone officers from the unspent balance of the 2022 budget of the monitoring and evaluation work programme to that of 2023. The Committee also requested the Senior Monitoring and Evaluation Officer to prepare: (a) Terms of Reference for an external assessment of the evaluation function of the Multilateral Fund, aligned to the recommendations to the assessment by the MOPAN, for the consideration of the Executive Committee at its 92nd meeting; and (b) On a trial basis, at the 93rd meeting, a biennial monitoring and evaluation work programme and budget for the years 2024 and 2025, and to report annually on its status of implementation and achievements, starting from the 95th meeting.

Programme implementation

 

Consolidated progress report and progress reports of bilateral and IAs as at 31 December 2021 (decisions 91/10 – 91/15)

 

The Executive Committee noted the 2021 consolidated progress report[11] and annual progress reports on the implementation of approved projects and activities submitted by bilateral and IAs,[12] and also noted with appreciation, the efforts undertaken by bilateral and IAs in reporting their 2021 activities. Bilateral and IAs would report, at the 92nd meeting, on 109 projects with implementation delays and 37 ongoing projects or tranches recommended for additional status reports.[13] The Committee also approved the extension of projects for seven countries,[14] requested the Secretariat to send a letter to the Government of Suriname and UNEP as the implementing agency regarding possible cancellation of the HCFC phase‑out management plan (HPMP) (stage I, third tranche) for the country, and cancelled the HPMP (stage I, second tranche) for Haiti.

Status reports and reports on projects with specific reporting requirements[15] (decisions 91/16 to 91/27 and decision 91/49)

 

The Executive Committee considered the reports on projects with specific reporting requirements for blanket approval including progress reports, or specific requests, related to stage I or stage II of HPMPs for 10 countries;[16] and methyl bromide phase‑out plan for one country. The Committee also considered two reports on projects with specific reporting requirements for individual consideration, one related to the HPMP for Brazil, and the other on the control of emissions of HFC-23 generated in the production of HCFC-22 in Argentina. The Committee noted all the reports on the implementation of the projects and made a number of decisions to approve or follow up on specific issues. The Committee held meetings of an informal group to discuss the three reports on projects with specific reporting requirements pertaining to China, and agreed to continue, at the 92nd meeting, its discussions on the report on progress in the implementation of activities listed in decision 83/41(e) and on any updates that the Government of China might wish to provide regarding its progress in implementing the activities described in decision 83/41.

 

2022 Consolidated project completion report[17] (decision 91/28)

The Executive Committee urged bilateral and IAs to submit to the 92nd meeting the project completion reports (PCRs) for multi-year agreements (MYAs) and individual projects that were due, and if they were not going to submit them, to provide the reasons. Lead and cooperating agencies were urged to closely coordinate their work in finalizing their portion of PCRs to allow the lead IA to submit the completed PCRs according to schedule. The Committee encouraged bilateral and IAs to ensure the inclusion of relevant and useful information about the lessons learned and the reasons for any delays, beyond anecdotal evidence, with a view to enabling the formulation of actionable recommendations for improvements in future project implementation or the replicability of good practices, and invited all those involved in the preparation and implementation of MYAs and individual projects to take into consideration the relevant lessons learned from PCRs when preparing and implementing future projects. The Committee also reiterated decisions 23/8(i) and 81/29, encouraging bilateral and implementing agencies to submit PCRs within six months of the operational completion of the projects to avoid a situation whereby submitted funding requests for the second or subsequent tranches of stage II or for subsequent stages of HCFC phase-out management plans were not considered.

 

Business planning

 

Update on the status of implementation of the 2022–2024 consolidated business plan of the Multilateral Fund and financial planning for the triennium 2021-2023[18] (decision 91/29)

 

The Executive Committee noted that the total value of activities submitted to the 91st meeting amounted to US $83,048,165 (including US $4,829,989 for HFC-related activities), including US $18,297,605 for project proposals not included in the 2022 business plans.

 

Tranche submission delays[19] (decision 91/30)

 

29 out of 43 activities related to tranches of HPMPs that were due for submission to the 91st meeting were submitted on time. Relevant bilateral and IAs indicated that the late submission of the tranches of HPMPs due for submission at the second meeting of 2022 would have no impact, or was unlikely to have an impact, on compliance with the Montreal Protocol, and that there was no indication that any of the countries concerned were in non‑compliance with the Montreal Protocol control measures. The Secretariat will send letters to the relevant Governments regarding the decisions on tranche submission delays.

 

2023‑2025 business plans (decisions 91/31-91/36)

 

The Executive Committee endorsed the 2023‑2025 consolidated business plan of the Multilateral Fund[20] as adjusted by the Secretariat and the Committee, taking into consideration relevant decisions taken at the 91st meeting, while noting that endorsement did not denote approval of the projects identified therein or their funding or tonnage levels.[21] The Committee decided to allow Nigeria to submit stage IV of its HPMP in 2025 and the request for the associated project preparation in 2023, and to maintain the energy-efficiency activities for Cambodia and Kyrgyzstan, which had agreements for the complete phase-out of HCFCs, noting that the implementing agencies concerned did not have any remaining HPMP tranches to request on behalf of those countries. The Committee also decided to note that the level of the activities in the business plans of the Governments of Austria and Germany for 2023–2025 should be considered in the light of the bilateral activity allocation for the triennium 2021–2023. Performance indicators were approved for UNDP, UNEP, UNIDO and the World Bank.[22]

 

Project proposals[23]

 

Request for funding additional activities to maintain energy efficiency for the servicing sector under decision 89/6(b) for low-volume-consuming countries that had completed their HCFC phase‑out management plans (decision 91/37)

 

The Executive Committee decided that decision 89/6 applied to low-volume-consuming countries that had already completed their HPMPs and to consider the proposal from Maldives, as contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/44, under agenda item 9(d) on projects recommended for individual consideration, in line with the above decision.

 

Submission of a Kigali HFC implementation plan and an individual HFC investment project in the absence of the cost guidelines or a template Agreement for HFC phase-down (decision 91/38)

 

The Executive Committee decided that: (a) in the absence of the cost guidelines for HFC phase-down, to consider HFC individual investment projects and stage I of the Kigali HFC implementation plans (KIPs) on a case‑by‑case basis and without setting a precedent for the cost guidelines or any future HFC individual investment projects and stage I of KIPs; (b) to consider the HFC individual investment project for Ecuador contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/40 and stage I of the KIP for the Niger contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/48 under agenda item 9(d) on projects recommended for individual consideration, in line with subparagraph (a) above; (c) to request the Secretariat to prepare a draft template for an Agreement for stage I of KIPs for consideration by the Executive Committee at the 92nd meeting; and d) to agree that the template Agreement would be reviewed once discussions on the criteria for funding HFC phase-down had been completed.

 

Collecting information for future discussions on consumption of HFCs in the local installation and assembly subsector (decision 91/39)

 

The Executive Committee decided to encourage Article 5 countries and implementing agencies, in the context of HFC surveys conducted during preparation of Kigali HFC implementation plans, to collect information on and provide estimates of any HFC consumption in the local installation and assembly subsector, when it was possible to do so and on a voluntary basis. The Secretariat was requested to prepare a document, for consideration at the 92nd meeting, that provided a description of the local installation and assembly subsector, identifying to the extent possible the types of equipment and refrigerants that characterized that subsector and the challenges in transitioning to low-global-warming-potential alternatives.

 

Bilateral cooperation[24] (decision 91/40)

 

The Executive Committee requested the Treasurer to offset the costs of the bilateral projects approved at the 91st meeting in the amount of US $3,531,749 (including agency support costs) against the balance of the bilateral contribution of the Government of Germany for 2021–2022.

Approved projects (decisions 91/41 to 91/60)[25]

 

Funding of US $65,645,782, including agency support costs was approved for: renewals of institutional strengthening (IS) projects (US $5,579,336) for 25 countries;[26] project preparations for stage II/III of HPMPs (US $224,700) for three countries;[27] verification of compliance of 17 countries with their HPMP Agreements (US $567,900);[28] preparation for Kigali HFC implementation plans (KIPs) and/or HFC investment‑related activities for 27 countries[29] including start-up activities for stage I of the KIP for one country[30] (US $3,763,617); new stages II/III of HPMPs for six countries[31] (US $15,290,977); tranches of stage I of the HPMPs (US $3,125,866) for six countries[32] and tranches of stage II of the HPMPs (US $12,857,712) for 10 countries;[33] second tranche of stage II of the HCFC production phase‑out management plan (HPPMP) for one country[34] (US $23,232,000); a global technical assistance project[35] and an investment project on additional activities to maintain energy efficiency for the servicing sector under decision 89/6(b) for one country[36] (US $1,003,674).

 

UNEP’s Compliance Assistance Programme[37] (decision 91/61)

 

The Executive Committee approved the 2023 CAP budget at a level of US $10,129,162, plus agency support costs (US $810,333). The Executive Committee requested UNEP, in future submissions of the CAP budget, to continue providing detailed information on the activities for which the global funds would be used; extending the prioritization of funding between CAP budget lines so as to accommodate changing priorities and providing details, pursuant to decisions 47/24 and 50/26, on the reallocations made; reporting on the current post levels of staff and informing the Executive Committee of any changes thereto, particularly with respect to any increased budget allocations; and providing a budget for the year in question and a report on the costs incurred in the year prior to the previous year.

 

2023 core unit costs for UNDP, UNIDO, and the World Bank[38] (decision 91/62)

 

The Executive Committee approved core unit funding for 2023 for UNDP of US $2,142,835, UNIDO of US $2,050,407, and the World Bank of US $1,735,000, and noted with appreciation, that core unit operations of UNIDO and the World Bank were below their budgeted levels and that the agencies would be returning unused balances at the 91st meeting.

 

Review of institutional strengthening projects, including funding levels, terminal report and extension request formats, and performance indicators that could be used consistently by all Article 5 countries (decision 74/51(d)) (decision 91/63)

 

The Committee continued discussing this issue at the 91st meeting on the basis of a proposal for a revised format for terminal reports and requests for extension, including potential performance indicators. The contact group on the item was reconstituted to facilitate further discussion. Several members, noting that Article 5 countries were facing greater responsibilities under the Kigali Amendment while concurrently implementing their HPMPs, said that new reporting requirements should not impose an additional burden on national ozone units. Clarification was sought regarding the additional information requested from governments in the revised format and the inclusion of gender mainstreaming, which would create more work for those units. Other members stated that the report was helpful in framing units’ new responsibilities and that having a common set of indicators would ensure consistency in reporting and provide a better understanding of the impact of institutional strengthening projects.

 

The Committee decided to approve the revised format for terminal reports and requests for the extension of IS funding and the corresponding performance indicators[39] and requested Article 5 countries to use the revised format as of the first meeting of the Executive Committee in 2023. The Committee also approved an increase in funding for all IS projects and renewals at a level 38 percent higher than that agreed at the 74th meeting, with a minimum level of funding of US $60,000 per year. Additionally, the duration of IS renewal implementation phases was extended from two to three years beginning with proposals submitted from the 92nd meeting onward. The Secretariat was requested to update the guide for preparation of IS renewal requests, and to submit a report on the review of the revised format no later than the second meeting of 2028, and a further review of IS projects, including funding levels, no later than the second meeting of 2029.

 

Matters related to the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol

 

Development of the cost guidelines for the phase-down of HFCs in Article 5 countries: Analysis of the level and modalities of funding for HFC phase-down in the refrigeration servicing sector

Following the initial discussion at parts I and II of the 89th meeting and at the 90th meeting, discussion continued at the 91st meeting based on document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/61. Discussion in a contact group made progress on the text of a draft decision but had not reached final agreement on levels of funding for LVC and non-LVC countries. The contact group had also agreed that the working funding table would include a record of previous proposals that had been made, but that the negotiations at the 92nd meeting would proceed on the basis of the latest unified proposals from Article 5 and non-Article 5 countries, while also noting that Article 5 countries had been clear that they would be working on the basis of reductions from the HFC baseline. The Executive Committee agreed to continue consideration of the level and modalities of funding for HFC phase-down in the refrigeration servicing sector at its 92nd meeting, on the basis of inter alia the working document on the item including the draft recommendation text and working funding tables.[40]

 

Development of the cost guidelines for the phase-down of HFCs in Article 5 countries: Draft criteria for funding including consideration of operationalizing paragraph 24 of decision XXVIII/2 (decision 91/64)

Following successful discussions at the 89th and 90th meetings of the Executive Committee, document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/62 was introduced and a contact group constituted to continue discussion on this agenda item. The contact group made progress, including discussing scenarios for the starting point based on a presentation by the Secretariat. Regarding cost-effectiveness thresholds, the group agreed to consider projects for transport refrigeration on a case-by-case basis, to continue to discuss, at the subsequent meeting, thresholds for stationary air-conditioning and commercial refrigeration and incremental operating costs (IOCs) on the basis of the working texts used in the contact group, and to request the Secretariat to provide information to assist the Executive Committee in its consideration of what is a “small- and medium-sized” enterprise in the commercial air-conditioning manufacturing and commercial refrigeration manufacturing sectors. The Executive Committee agreed to pursue, at its 92nd meeting, consideration of the development of the cost guidelines for the phase-down of HFCs in Article 5 countries on the basis of inter alia the working text on the cost-effectiveness thresholds and IOCs. [41]

 

Energy efficiency

 

Criteria for pilot projects to maintain and/or enhance energy efficiency of replacement technologies and equipment in the context of HFC phase-down (decision 90/50(b)(i)) (decision 91/65) [42]

 

Following the introduction of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/63 by the Secretariat and the initial exchange of views, a contact group was established to discuss this item further. Views shared included the urgent need for Article 5 countries to begin pilot and demonstration projects, especially given that proposals for individual HFC phase‑down projects and for KIPs could be submitted to the subsequent meeting of the Executive Committee; the question of whether pilot projects should include the establishment of energy‑efficiency testing centres or whether countries could be encouraged to use existing testing centres; why the Secretariat had suggested actions for the servicing sector additional to those agreed in decision 89/6; whether the inclusion of GWP figures for refrigerants in energy-efficiency standards should be mandatory, given that such standards were often developed without reference to GWP levels; and the processes to be followed by the Executive Committee in discussing the submission of pilot projects.

The contact group was able to reach agreement on the rules and criteria for funding pilot projects. The contact group had also agreed to remove the reference to some of the proposed criteria from the list of activities that could be funded, including testing centres and co-financing, on the understanding that these items would remain under discussion within the operational framework agenda item. Projects should be submitted as of the 93rd meeting up to and including the 96th meeting and would be considered on a case-by-case basis. They should aim to have broad replicability within the country, region or sector and should take into account regional and geographic distribution. The Committee also decided to establish a funding window for pilot projects in the amount of US $20 million with the possibility of augmenting that funding window at a future meeting.

Operational framework to further elaborate on institutional aspects and projects and activities that could be undertaken by the Multilateral Fund for maintaining and/or enhancing the energy efficiency of replacement technologies and equipment in the manufacturing and servicing sectors when phasing down HFCs in the categories set out in document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/89/12 in the context of implementing options 1 and 2 in table 3 of the document (decision 90/50(b)(ii))

 

Following discussions at the 89th and 90th meetings of the Executive Committee, an updated document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/64 was introduced. Several members discussed preferences for discussing all energy-efficiency issues in either one overarching contact group or several more specific contact groups. It was decided that this agenda item would be discussed in a separate contact group. A contact group was established and following discussion, the Executive Committee agreed to pursue, at its 92nd meeting, consideration of the operational framework to further elaborate on institutional aspects and projects and activities that could be undertaken by the Multilateral Fund for maintaining and/or enhancing the energy efficiency of replacement technologies and equipment in the manufacturing and servicing sectors when phasing down HFCs in the categories set out in document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/89/12 in the context of implementing options 1 and 2 in table 3 of the document (decision 90/50(b)(ii)) and to take into consideration the relevant items referred to in paragraph 242 of the report of the meeting[43] and to also use, inter alia, the working text provided at the 91st meeting by the Governments of Brazil and India,[44] for subsequent discussions.

 

Report on consultations with the secretariats of the Global Environment Facility and the Green Climate Fund and other relevant funding institutions on opportunities for sharing information on policies, projects and relevant funding modalities relating to maintaining and/or enhancing energy efficiency while phasing down HFCs (decision 90/50(b)(iii))

 

Document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/65 was introduced and following an exchange of views in the plenary it was decided that further discussion on this matter would be done in the contact group established under agenda item 11(b)(ii). Following discussions in the contact group, the Committee decided to pursue, at its 92nd meeting, consideration of the report on consultations with the secretariats of the Global Environment Facility and the Green Climate Fund and other relevant funding institutions on opportunities for sharing information on policies, projects and relevant funding modalities relating to maintaining and/or enhancing energy efficiency while phasing down HFCs (decision 90/50(b)(iii)).

 

Criteria for a funding window for an inventory of banks of used or unwanted controlled substances and a plan for the collection, transport, and disposal of such substances (decision 90/49(c)) (decision 91/66)

 

Document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/66 was introduced, and an exchange of views was held in the plenary. Topics discussed included: that disposal was an important matter under the Montreal Protocol, that determining the size of banks of used or unwanted controlled substances through inventories was a first step and that there was a need to bear in mind the particular challenges faced by Article 5 countries whose national ozone units did not exercise control over domestic regulations governing the management and disposal of hazardous wastes; potential linkages between the topic at hand and the matters dealt with under the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal and the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants; the importance of cooperation in that regard at the national level, not least to avoid any duplication of efforts; and proposed funding levels and the scope of the funding window. A contact group was established to pursue further discussions on criteria for a funding window for the inventory of banks of used or unwanted controlled substances and a plan for the collection, transport, and disposal of such substances, on the understanding that the issue of disposal should further be considered as part of the discussion on the HFC cost guidelines.

 

Following these discussions, the Executive Committee decided to establish a funding window for the preparation of national inventories of banks of used or unwanted controlled substances and a plan for the collection, transport and disposal of such substances, including consideration of recycling, reclamation and cost-effective destruction. It also agreed on criteria for the preparation of these national inventories, and the related funding amounts. The Committee agreed that projects under the funding window would be submitted for the consideration of the Executive Committee as of the 93rd meeting up to and including the 97th meeting, on the understanding that they would be included in the relevant business plans before their approval.

 

Analysis related to the capacity of the Multilateral Fund institutions to address HFC phase-down (decision 89/4) (decision 91/67)

 

Following the introduction of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/67, a brief exchange of views was held in plenary. Members noted that the workload associated with HFC phase‑down was already adding complexity to the work of the Multilateral Fund institutions, and that it was important to consider the needs of those institutions in order for them to continue delivering on their mandates. The Committee decided to note the analysis contained in the document as a framework for the discussions that would take place under other agenda items. The Secretariat was requested to continue discussions with the implementing agencies on their perspectives regarding the additional resources needed on the basis of the expected increase in workload associated with HFC phase-down and to consider them in its review of the administrative cost regime of the Multilateral Fund, to be submitted at the 93rd meeting.

 

Opportunities to further highlight how the sustainability of Multilateral Fund-supported activities would be ensured, including by further clarifying in the document submitted by the Secretariat how partner capacity, risks and critical assumptions were considered (decision 89/1(c)(iii))

 

Following the introduction of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/68, a brief exchange of views was held in plenary. Members supported the proposed changes to documents for tranches and new stages of HPMPs and said that a section on the sustainability of HCFC phase-out and an assessment of risks would also be a pertinent addition to documents related to KIPs. It was also noted that there were already various ways in which risk and sustainability were being managed and evaluated. The Committee noted the report on opportunities to further highlight how the sustainability of activities supported by the Multilateral Fund would be ensured (decision 89/1(c)(iii) as contained in the document presented.

 

Overview of current monitoring, reporting, verification and enforceable licensing and quota systems developed with support from the Multilateral Fund (decision 89/2) (decision 91/68)

 

Following discussions at the 89th meeting, document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/69 was introduced. After an exchange of views in plenary, the Committee decided to defer to the 93rd meeting consideration of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/69 on the overview of current monitoring, reporting, verification and enforceable licensing and quota systems developed with support from the Multilateral Fund (decision 89/2), taking into account the discussions at its 89th and 91st meetings and the relevant discussions at the Thirty-Fourth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, forty-fifth meeting of the Open-ended Working Group of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, including the workshop on further strengthening the effective implementation and enforcement of the Montreal Protocol to be held in line with decision XXXIV/8, and, if applicable, the Thirty-Fifth Meeting of the Parties.

 

Update of the information strategy of the Multilateral Fund including a detailed plan for information and knowledge management, the website/information technology requirements, the resources needed, and clear timelines for implementation (decision 89/1(c)(ii)) (decision 91/69)

 

Following the introduction of documents UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/70 and UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/Inf.2, there was broad support for the update of the information strategy of the Multilateral Fund and the development of a new information and knowledge management system. The initiative would benefit all stakeholders, including the Secretariat, implementing agencies, countries, researchers and academics, and could raise the profile of the Multilateral Fund. It would help the Executive Committee to modernize its approach to data management and streamline its work, as recommended in the 2019 MOPAN assessment of the performance of the Multilateral Fund and would also help to improve transparency. While costly, the initiative was necessary and critical. The new system would include an online reporting facility for country programme data; country profiles; a revamped meeting portal with improved access to meeting documents; a handbook for accessing decisions, policies, procedures and guidelines; and a data portal with filters and dashboards that included access for public users. Members highlighted the importance of cybersecurity provisions for the new system and the development of training tools for its use.  The Committee decided to note the report and to approve the actions for the implementation of the new knowledge management system described in the document referred to above, with their corresponding timelines and estimated associated costs for phases 1 and 2. The Secretariat was requested to inform on the progress of implementation of phases 1 and 2 as a part of the Secretariat activities reporting and to submit an update of the plan and a request for funding for phase 3 following the completion of phases 1 and 2.

 

Report of the Sub-group on the Production Sector[45] (decisions 91/70 to 91/72)

 

The Sub‑group on the Production Sector (Brazil, Canada (facilitator), Cuba, Finland, India, Italy, the United States of America and Zimbabwe) met twice in the margins of the meeting and took decisions on three items on the agenda.

 

2021 verification report of the HCFC production sector (decision 91/70)

 

At the recommendation of the Sub-group, the Executive Committee noted the 2021 verification report of the HCFC production sector in China and the report on the outcome of the assessment by the Government of an HCFC producer that might have exceeded its assigned 2020 quota for production of ODS for domestic use, submitted in line with decision 88/79(d). It also noted that the 2021 verification referred to above had been undertaken virtually in the light of the coronavirus disease pandemic and that the World Bank had not yet been able to undertake the verification required by decisions 84/93(b), 86/99(e) and 88/79(c) or to provide the addenda required by decision 88/79(b)(i). The Committee also requested the World Bank to submit to the Committee at the last meeting of 2023: an addendum to the 2019, 2020, and 2021 verification report of the HCFC production sector in China; the one-off verifications required by decisions 86/99(e) and 88/79(c); an update on one enterprise, including in relation to the integrated nature, closure and dismantling of the HCFC-22 production line, as part of the verification of the 2022 HCFC production sector in China. The World Bank was requested to verify, on a one-off basis, that the newly established production lines for HCFC-22 in three enterprises, as well as the line in one enterprise for HCFC-133a, were vertically integrated with the production of the downstream facilities and that all HCFCs produced in the new lines would be for feedstock use, and to submit that report to the last Executive Committee meeting of 2023. Regarding HFC-23 by-product generation and emission, the Government of China, through the World Bank, was invited to report on several aspects relating to the matter at the last meeting of 2023.

 

Progress report on implementation of the first tranche and request for funding of the second tranche of stage II of the HPPMP (decision 91/71)

 

The Committee approved the second tranche of the HPPMP for China, and the corresponding 2023–2024 tranche implementation plan; requested the Government of China, through the World Bank, to submit reports related to HCFC feedstock applications and HCFC dealers in China; noted the 2021 notification by the Government requiring the destruction, to the extent practicable, of HFC-23 by-product from HCFC-22 and HFC production facilities; and invited the Government, through the World Bank, to provide an update at the last meeting of 2023 containing the most recent information on HFC-23 generation, destruction and emissions in China and any relevant regulatory or implementation updates.

 

Draft guidelines and the standard format used for the verification of ODS production phase out (decision 90/52)

 

The Committee agreed to continue its discussions of the draft guidelines and the standard format used for the verification of ODS production phase-out at a future meeting of the Executive Committee.

Draft HCFC production sector guidelines (decision 91/72)

 

The Committee decided to defer consideration of the draft HCFC production sector guidelines to a future meeting of the Executive Committee.

Other matters

 

Dates and venues of the 92nd to 97th meetings of the Executive Committee[46] (decision 91/73)

 

The Committee decided to hold its 92nd meeting from 29 May to 2 June 2023, its 93rd meeting from 11 to 15 December 2023, its 94th meeting from 10 to 14 June 2024 (with a fallback option of 27 to 31 May 2024), and its 95th meeting from 2 to 6 December 2024. All meetings will be held in Montreal.

 

Report of the 91st meeting

 

A complete record of all decisions made at the 91st meeting can be found on the meeting page.[47]

 

Attendance at the 91st meeting of the Executive Committee

Executive Committee Members

Co‑opted countries

 

 

Article 5

 

 

 

Bahrain

Kuwait, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia

Brazil

Argentina, Uruguay

Chad

Benin, Burkina Faso, Mauritania

Cuba

Mexico

Guyana

Barbados, Grenada, Trinidad and Tobago

India

China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Micronesia (Federated States of)

Zimbabwe

Ghana, Lesotho, Zambia

 

 

Non-Article 5

 

 

 

Belgium

Netherlands

Canada

Australia

Finland

Norway

Italy

France, Germany, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Japan

 

Romania*

Estonia

United States of America

 

* Did not attend



[1] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/2

[2] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/3

[3] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/4

[4] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/5

[5]  UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/6

[6] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/7

[7] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/8 and Add.1

[8] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/9

[9] Contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/10

[10]  As contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/11/Rev.1

[11] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/12

[12] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/13, UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/14, UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/15, UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/16, and UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/17

[13] Annexes IV to VIII of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72

[14] Botswana, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Somalia, the Sudan and Zimbabwe.

[15] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/18 and Add.1

[16] Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire, Philippines (the), Senegal, Trinidad and Tobago, and Uruguay.

[17] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/19

[18] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/20

[19] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/21

[20] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/22

[22] Annexes XII to XV to document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72

[23] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/28

[24]  UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/29

[25] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/30 and UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/31

[26] Armenia, Belize, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Cote d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Fiji, Ghana, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Libya, Mauritania, Mexico, Mozambique, Nigeria, Peru, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Turkey, and Viet Nam.

[27] Haiti, Mexico and Viet Nam.

[28] Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, Cabo Verde, Comoros, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Georgia, Guatemala, Jamaica, Malawi, Paraguay, Rwanda, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda and Zambia.

[29] Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cabo Verde, Comoros (the), Congo (the), Cote d’Ivoire, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Malaysia, Mongolia, Morocco, Philippines (the), Saint Lucia, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Pacific Island Countries (Cook Islands, Kiribati, Marshall Islands (the), Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu).

[30] Niger

[31] Barbados, Eritrea, India, Nigeria, South Africa, and Togo.

[32] Barbados, Congo (the), Mauritania, South Africa, South Sudan, and Syrian Arab Republic.

[33] Albania, China, India, Morocco, Jordan, Montenegro, Serbia, Turkmenistan, Venezuela and Viet Nam..

[34] China

[35] Twinning of ozone officers and national energy-efficiency policymakers to support Kigali Amendment objectives

[36] Maldives

[37] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/58

[38] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/59

[39] Annex XXX of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72

[40] Annex XXXI of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72

[41] Annex XXXII of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72

[42] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/61

[43] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72

[44] Annex XXXIII of document UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72

[45] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/71

[46] UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/Inf.3

[47] http://multilateralfund.org/91/default.aspx

 Report of the ninety first meeting of the Executive Committee

91PMS_summary.pdfPost meeting summary of the 91st meeting of the Executive Committee
9172.pdfUNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72Report of the ninety-first meeting of the Executive Committee

 تقرير الإجتماع الحادي والتسعين للجنة التنفيذية

A9172.pdfUNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72تقرير الإجتماع الحادي والتسعين للجنة التنفيذية

 Rapport de la quatre-vingt-onzième réunion du Comité exécutif

F9172.pdfUNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72 Rapport de la quatre-vingt-onzième réunion du Comité exécutif

 Informe de la nonagésima primera reunión del Comité Ejecutivo

S9172.pdfUNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/91/72Informe de la nonagésima primera reunión del Comité Ejecutivo

 Adjusted consolidated business plan of the Multilateral Fund 2023-2025

Adjusted consolidated business plan of the Multilateral Fund 2023-2025.xlsAdjusted consolidated business plan of the Multilateral Fund 2023-2025

 Links

  In-session site for the 91st meeting (Participants only)